Top 15 Photography Types That You Need to Know

15 Photography Types

In the era of camera phones, people constantly click and share their photos; these camera phones are making people exposed to photography and to visual imagery in various forms. We look at the photos shared by our friends on social media, we see the advertising campaigns on the stores; photography is used to communicate or to express to the viewer. Many people click pictures every day but, few of them know that how these different photography types have been inspiring photographers? When we get to know the different photography types, we gain the knowledge of different genre which may fit to our photography habits.

Let us look at these following 15 different genres of photography:

Aerial Photography: As we fly or get above the ground level, we always try to shoot the beautiful scene which we see below us. For example, when we are in a flight we always try to capture the landscape scene which we can see from above. This is called Aerial photography.

French picture taker and balloonist, Gaspar Felix Tournachon, took the main aeronautical photo in 1858. He tested for a long time before he could create the photo. He had caught the French town, Petit-Becetre, from a hot-air swell, 80 meters over the ground.

Architectural Photography: Framing the colour, shape, layout or art of any structure can be soothing to eyes. All the visuals of monuments or buildings are including in this genre of photography. Both, the interior and the exterior of a building can be framed, but the challenging aspect for the photographer is to keep in mind of the lighting and distortion.

Candid Photography: In this form of photography, we capture the moments as they happen. The object isn’t aware of the photographer, so appear natural and hence the picture results into a very relaxed one.

Expert tip: Use a very long zoom for capturing the candid images. If you’ll use the short zoom lens, then the object may get aware that you are framing them and so you can lose a relaxed and natural picture.

Documentary Photography: These are the manual pictures that are used to highlight a particular picture or story. This genre includes manual pictures that create a photo story. These all are representational pictures which may include a story of war, science, fiction and many more. In this genre, we always try to capture all the details which in turn result in making a picture tell a story.

Fashion Photography: These photography types are basically used to advertise something and then finally to sell it. This genre includes the glamorization of the product which makes a product look attractive and so customers willingly buy it.

These types of photos must be very creatively and sharply taken. We can capture them anywhere like, in a studio, in an apartment or anywhere outdoors. We have to do the pre-shooting preparation before framing the product. The preparation may include makeup, styles, location, lighting and obviously the model plays a very vital role.

Food Photography: Every day we are served with at least something either on the dining table or in a restaurant. The food which is served, is clicked and is shared by us in the form of images. The photography which is used by restaurants, websites or bloggers to pull customers and to sell their product is called as food photography.

Expert tip: Food photography is most likely to be captured in natural light. Using flash is never suggested while capturing the food, as it can include unwanted things in our image. It’s a big NO in this style. Using flash may look our food greasy and the natural colours may wash out of the photos.

Landscape Photography: This type of photography is one of the most popular kind of photography. In this genre, the photography of beautiful sceneries, impact of environmental conditions is done. We always love to capture a beautiful landscape as we see an eye-soothing and beautiful scene.

If we want a perfect landscape shot, then we must take care of the proper lighting. Using a tripod is always suggested as shaking of the camera can result in a shaky picture that won’t look good. Using high shutter gives us a perfect image as the desired amount of light may fall inside the camera and our image may look bright and sharp.

Night-long Exposure Photography: As it gets dark, there are various beautiful aspects which a viewer can’t see with the naked eye and a camera can do it for us. This photography is mainly focused on the knowledge of light, shutter and aperture.

For getting a perfect piece of these photos, we must be comfortable enough with the manual mode of the camera and so the correct settings can be implemented.

Photojournalism: This type of photography is very similar to that of documentary photography. This include the photography of the events are happening right now and then it is informed to the whole world.

For example, whatever we see in newspapers, news or in magazines are all a result of photojournalism.

This include the photography of unexpected events at a planned place. A photographer has to reach at a correct place at a correct time to make it happen perfectly.

Conceptual/Fine Art Photography: This genre of photography includes telling a story. In this genre, we create our own story and our own characters in a made-up environment. We are supposed to have an idea of how our output will look like and how we can plan to make it so.

The photographer always tries to send a message, an idea or an emotion by these pictures.

Portrait Photography: In this kind of photography, all the focus is made on the mood or on the expressions of the object. It is an intriguing subject for the photographers. A portrait can be a full-body portrait or can be close-up portrait. Whichever the image we take, our face is focused the most.

It must be kept in mind that the image must be sharp and is well focused. Eyes must be specially focused as they throw maximum emotions. Jokes can be told once we have to make a pleasant mood of our object.

Sport Photography: This is one of those photography types which includes framing of the objects which are either in fast motion or in action. These sporting events are captured by using very long lenses.

Expert tip: It is advisable to use high ISO while clicking this type of photos. By high ISO, we are enabled to make high shutter speed, which in turn produce quality images. We can change angles accordingly and can get variety of images.

Street Photography: Capturing something in our day-to-day life or at public places is most probably said as street photography. It is similar to that of candid photography. In this genre, photographer visualize the real-life scene or behind the scene images, but in candid the focus is on the object or on a popular tourist spot.

A photographer must observe every little aspect which is around him/her. As soon as a story is visualized, the image must be captured.

War Photography: This genre works on the areas where a war is going on, or is finished. The photographers even put their life in danger for capturing these photos. These pictures or the stories can be recorded even after a war is finished.

The photography kit of a war photographer must be simplified enough to change the lenses and the camera according to the situation. It is highly denied not to carry heavy accessories with them. Heavy accessories may fall us in trouble if an adverse situation comes.

10 Tips To Tell You How To Start A Photography Business By Finding Your Photography Niche

Sooner or later, most photography enthusiast give some thought to “how to start a photography business.” Unfortunately, there are a ‘few’ challenges that “doom” us to failure. One of the biggest challenges that we bring is our failure to make the distinctions between our love of photography (re: our enjoyment and passion for photography) and the business of photography (understanding buying and spending habits of people that are photography customers).

For example, many of us think that because our photography work is “so good,” that we shouldn’t have that much trouble selling it. We, sometimes, mistakenly, think that great art and photography “sells itself.” Big mistake! Great photography does not sell itself. In the business world, nothing sells itself – nothing! Knowing this is critical to start a photography business.

Our failure to make the distinction between our passion for photography and our desire to be in the photo business is also evident in how we try to tell people about what we do. For example, photography customers don’t care what type of equipment we use. They don’t care how many mega-pixels we have, nor how much our equipment cost us, nor what brand of camera we use. Photography customers (current and potential) want to know that we can, and will, produce the highest quality photography work for them.

Think about it, the mechanics that repair our cars don’t tell us what tools that they use. The chefs in the restaurants that we patronize don’t tell us what type of pots, pans or stoves that they use. In those businesses, it is already established what customers want and how best to give it to them. In other words, other businesses do a better job of understanding their ‘niche.’ In order to start a photography business that is consistently successful and growing, we must be clear on what niche we are offering and how to sell the benefits of our niche to the customers.

Another mistake that we budding photography business owners repeat is failing to “specialize” (know our photography niche) in what we do. As photography enthusiasts, we enjoy shooting any and everything. As photographers, that’s just fine. However, when we start a photography business, we, mistakenly, try to be ‘all things to all people’ – we take every photography job offered us.

One of the obvious problems with this approach is our failure to recognize how it drastically cheapens the value of what we do as skilled photographers, in the eyes of the customers. Mistakenly, we want our customers (current and potential) to know that we can photograph anything – after all, we’re very versatile photographers! What the customers actually see is that we’re not “versatile photographers,” we’re just someone with a camera that’s available to take pictures when they call us. Serious photography customers (re: those that can afford to spend regularly) want to do business with specialists – photographers that know their photography niche.

Successful wedding photographers are clear on this, as an example of my point. Their ‘primary’ customer (usually the bride) has dreamed about her wedding day for most of her life. She isn’t looking for a vesatile photographer. She wants a “wedding photographer” that can make her ‘look’ as good, happy and beautiful as she has been in all of her lifelong dreams of ‘her day’ – her wedding day. There’s a special skill to this type of photography service. In fact, this niche has more to do with well developed ‘people skills,’ in my opinion. Successful wedding photographers that are clear on these nuances are more successful in business.

Do your research.

Inventory Your Photo Collection – Take a look at your photo collections. Determine what it is that you 1.) shoot the most; 2.) shoot consistently well; and 3.) enjoy shooting. Identify your and categorize the photos into various niches, i.e. portraits, sports, glamor, pets, children, landscape, etc.
Research The Photography Markets – Do internet searches using the words “photography niche.” Also, use the type of niche that you think your photos fit. For example, “event photography niche,” “wedding photography niche,” etc. Also, a good source to help identify some of the photo markets is “The Photographer’s Market.” This is a book that is published annually and claims to provide photo buying contacts and information. Online searches are the most useful, in my opinion. Books by author and photographer, Dan Heller are good places to get a better understanding of the vast world of photography, without all the ‘artsy-hype,’ in my opinion. He also has a very informative website – DanHeller.com
Identify ‘Real’ Markets – Find out what type of photography (of your specialties) your customers currently are purchasing. What type of photography is selling? At some point, you’ll have to ‘balance’ the realities of the different niches. There can be some factors that aren’t consistent across all photography niches. For example, some niches require longer “workflow” (workflow is the post production process of taking photos) periods and tasks than others. Higher quality portraits normally require photo editing – which is time-consuming. Event photography requires the processing, packaging and delivering (presenting) of photos. True story: I went through my large photo collections and found that I had a very large number of outstandingly beautiful flowers. I can’t begin to tell you my disappointment when I found out that there is ‘virtually’ no market of photos of flowers – it seems that everybody has them already, everybody! Lesson learned – identify ‘real’ markets.

Ten Tips To Assist You To Identify Your Niche

Identify specialties that fit your style:
Determine if you have the necessary equipment for the niche
Do you have identifiable and specific skills in this niche area – can you articulate them?
Who is your target audience
What type of photography do they purchase the most
Where are they taking their photography business currently – your competition
What will be different about your services
Does where you live support your preferable niche
Is your niche ‘stock photography’ or ‘assignment photography’ – do you know the difference
What is the future potential and tendencies of your niche

Fortunately, the internet makes this information just a few clicks away. The information isn’t difficult to find and learn. Knowing your niche increases your confidence tremendously. Truly know your niche – and your photography business will follow!

Kalem Aquil is a ‘semi-burnt-out’ photographer that dispenses free, unsolicited (yet, very good and accurate) tips and advice to budding photographers that want to take their photography business to the next level. He dispenses such advice to budding photographers such as “where to start,” “what to charge,” “how to know if you’re really, really ready,” etc. etc. etc. He dispenses his free and unsolicited advice here [http://www.marketing-for-photographers-and-photography.com/amateurphotographytips.html]. Subscribe to his free ezine, the “Best Amateur Photography Tips Digest [http://www.marketing-for-photographers-and-photography.com